Friday, December 28, 2012

Wow, it is now months since I have posted anything to my blog, but I finally redid the template, and I am determined to start posting again. I recently finished the ninth revision of my second book, and after one or two more times through, I think it will be ready to submit.
Christmas was wonderful. I got to be home with my family. That is all I need for a great Christmas. I hate to see the Winter Break end after New Year's, but I am excited to move forward to spring. Here in Bountiful, Utah we are deep in snow. It is beautiful, and yet I can't wait for sunshine, greenery, and warm weather. Of course, I suppose we wouldn't have our amazing springs, summers, and falls without rigorous, snowy winters. Na ja, so geht das!
I have been reading through Pride and Prejudice for the umpteenth time. To learn an art properly, one must continually sit at the feet of its masters. I just love some of the words and phrases she uses.
a report soon followed
air of decided fashion
whose dislike of his general behaviour was sharpened into particular resentment
Upon my honour
insupportable
obliged to seek another branch of the subject
a most disagreeable, horrid man
there was no enduring him
Did you not?
To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying
made himself agreeable nowhere
To all these high-flown expressions Elizabeth listened with all the insensibility of distrust.
Oh what beautiful, vintage ways of saying things! I love it. That is why I write Regency.
I wish you all a Happy New Year!


4 comments:

Joyce DiPastena said...

I agree, what beautiful language. No one can turn a phrase like the masters of literature. Thanks for sharing some of your favorites, Wanda. I don't write Regency, but this is why I read it. :-)

Wanda Luce said...

Thanks, Joyce. Aren't they a pleasure to read. Likely indulging in a delicacy.

Wanda Luce said...

Oops! LIKE indulging in a delicacy. Thanks, Joyce, for taking a minute to check out the new look.

Anonymous said...

It's amazing to me that even after 200 years Jane Austen's work still influences many today.

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